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Divers Rescue Survivor from Jascon 4 (Nigeria)

Posted by Amanda on June 11, 2013 at 12:00 AM Comments comments (8)

On Sunday 26 May, the tugboat Jascon 4 ran into difficulties whilst engaged in static towing operations, capsized and sank with a crew of 12 on board.

At the time, the tug was approx. 30 km off the coast of Escravos in Nigeria, offering assistance to a tanker being loaded at a Single Mooring System (SBM). The rescue operation involving helicopters and other vessels swung into action almost immediately. At that time, there was no trace of the crew members.

At the moment of the disaster, the Lewek Toucan, chartered by West African Ventures, with a team of DCN divers on board, was 17 hours sailing distance from the accident site. The team was involved in saturation diving work for the Okpoho-Okono 16 pipeline project being undertaken by DCN Diving in collaboration with DCN Global.

As Internet reports about the accident continued to develop, the realisation grew among the divers that there could still be survivors of the Jascon 4, trapped in an air pocket.

Direct contact between the client and the management of DCN Global resulted in the immediate order to head for the accident site and offer all possible assistance in finding the crew members.

The current operation was immediately halted, with divers from DCN actually in saturation at a pressure of 70 metres. The Jascon 4 had however sunk in 30 metre-deep water. The 17 hour sailing time was used to bring the divers to a saturation pressure of 30 metres. Once at the accident site, the divers discovered that the wreck was upside down, and the cook on board the Jascon 4 was indeed trapped in an air pocket in a still intact compartment. After 62 hours trapped in the air pocket, he was brought to the surface safe and well, by the divers from DCN.

This successful rescue raised hope among the DCN team that other live victims would perhaps be found, but further investigations sadly revealed only the remains of 10 deceased crew members.

The 6 divers, the deck crew and technical staff worked uninterrupted. They can be duly proud of the result of their work: 1 person rescued alive, and 10 crew members retrieved from the wreck. Even the retrieval of remains represents an important contribution to the mourning process for the victims’ families.

Source: Susbea World News

SusbeaSA would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the subsea personnel and deck crew onboard the Lewek Toucan for there outstanding efforts and commitment into making this rescue operation successful. Well done guys and keep up the good work.


Scuba diver dies off Sydney's northern beaches

Posted by Amanda on February 9, 2013 at 6:25 PM Comments comments (0)

A close-knit scuba diving community is in mourning after the death of one of its members during a "technical dive" off Sydney's northern beaches.

The 41-year-old man was pulled unconscious from the water at 8.30am on Saturday after getting into difficulty at a depth of about 60 metres at a wreck off Barrenjoey Headland.

He was put on board a Broken Bay Water Police vessel, where he was treated by a doctor and paramedic who had been lowered from a rescue helicopter.

However, the man could not be revived and was pronounced dead at the scene.

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Sergeant Malcolm Jeffs, from the Police Diving Unit, says the man was with a group of seven other technical divers, who were devastated by the accident.

"The technical diving community is fairly close. I'm not sure how well they knew the person, but it's a very upsetting situation for all those involved," Sergeant Jeffs told reporters.

He said the group had been offered counselling services and were still being interviewed by police. Technical diving uses mixed gas combinations, which vary according to the depth of descent.

Sergeant Jeffs said the man's diving buddy conveyed him to the surface immediately after noticing he was in difficulty.

"Treatment appears to have been given as fast as possible. There's no indication that there was any delay in treatment or response to his situation."

Sergeant Jeffs said the police investigation was still in its infancy so it was not yet clear what had caused the death.

"We don't know whether it was equipment failure or some condition with him, so that's all part of the investigation that will be prepared and passed on to the coroner."

The man's family was yet to be informed, he said.

One of the divers who tried to help the man developed symptoms of decompression illness and was flown to the Prince of Wales Hospital, where he remains in a stable condition.

The man's diving gear has been seized for scientific examination.

Investigations are continuing and a report will be prepared for the coroner.

 

Source: The Sidney Morning Herald

Supervisor Fined!!

Posted by Amanda on February 6, 2013 at 7:20 PM Comments comments (0)

The supervisor of a diving project at Ramsgate Royal Harbour Marina has been fined for failing to ensure a standby diver was ready to enter the water in the event of an emergency.Duncan Gill, from Dover, was working for a diving company contracted to undertake an underwater inspection of the marina on 26 September 2011 when concerns were raised about the standard of his operation by a fellow diving supervisor on a neighbouring quayside.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigated and found that the standby diver was not in a state of immediate readiness to provide assistance to the diver in the water.

The standby diver should have been fully dressed and kitted up to enter the water with his diving helmet in hand or close by. However, he was only in his dry suit, which put the diver in the water at serious risk had he required urgent assistance.

Canterbury Magistrates' Court heard today (5 February) that Mr Gill had previously been served with a Prohibition Notice by HSE in October 2010 for a similar failing as a diving supervisor. His employer, who does not want to be named, had spent time retraining and mentoring him before allowing him to continue in his role, but Mr Gill ignored the guidance given.

Duncan Gill, of London Road, Dover, was fined £5,000 and ordered to pay £2,000 in costs after pleading guilty to a single breach of the Diving at Work Regulations 1997.

After the hearing, HSE Inspector Bill Chilton said:

"The diving supervisor has a critical role to play in ensuring that a dive is conducted in such a way that the safety of the divers in the water is protected at all times.

"It is reasonably foreseeable that a diver may require urgent assistance from a standby diver should an emergency unfold, and therefore, the standby diver should be ready and able to enter the water in seconds.

"Yet that did not happen on Mr Gill's watch, and this clearly compromised safety. He should have known better having previously been warned about his conduct as a supervisor, but he ignored the trust, training and guidance of his employer to repeat the same failings."

Further information on diving safety can be found online at www.hse.gov.uk/diving

Notes to editors

1.The Health and Safety Executive is Britain's national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice; promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice; and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk

2.Regulation 10(1)(i) of the Diving at Work Regulations 1997 states: "The supervisor shall, in respect of the diving operation for which he has been appointed as supervisor, ensure that it is carried out, so far as is reasonably practicable, without risk to the health and safety of all those taking part in that operation and of other persons who may be affected thereby."

Source: HSE

http://www.hse.gov.uk/press/2013/rnn-se-02913.htm

Offshore workers Kidnapped - Nigeria

Posted by Amanda on October 21, 2012 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (2)

Offshore vessels owner Bourbon today confirmed that 7 crew members, 6 Russians and 1 Estonian were kidnapped during the boarding of the Bourbon Liberty 249, which occurred on October 15, 2012 in Nigeria.

The other 9 crew members are still onboard the vessel which is heading for the Port of Onne. They are safe and sound, and in good health.

“The emergency unit set up immediately by BOURBON has been set up to aim at their rapid liberation under the safest security conditions,” said the company said in a statement

Crew abducted from ship operated by France's Bourbon

 

* Piracy growing off West Africa's oil-rich coast

 

Oct 17 (Reuters) - Pirates off the coast of Nigeria kidnapped six Russians and an Estonian during an attack on their ship on Monday, the French company operating the vessel said on Wednesday.

 

Another nine crew members were safe after the ship reached the Nigerian port of Onne in the oil-rich Niger Delta, said a spokeswoman for Bourbon, which supplies vessels to the offshore oil industry.

 

Pirate attacks are on the rise in the Gulf of Guinea, which is second only to the waters around Somalia for piracy.

 

Attackers usually seize boats to steal their cargo then free the crew. Kidnappings for ransom also take place in the waters around the delta, the heart of Africa's biggest energy industry.

 

Pirates freed a Greek-operated gasoline tanker earlier this month that they had hijacked in the Gulf of Guinea near Ivory Coast. Fuel ships are a favourite target.

 

In August pirates attacked a Greek-operated oil tanker with a crew of about 20 off the coast of Togo. They released the ship a few days later after stealing 3,000 tonnes of fuel.

 

Nigerian navy spokesman Commodore Kabir Aliyu said his forces were searching for the pirates involved in Monday's attack. (Reporting by Patrick Vignal; Additional reporting by Tife Owolabi in Yenagoa; Writing by Tim Cocks; Editing by Andrew Heavens)


http://www.offshoreenergytoday.com/offshore-workers-kidnapped-in-nigeria/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9926a31691-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_source=Offshore+Energy+Today.com

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/17/nigeria-kidnapping-idUSL5E8LHI4X20121017


Bibby Topaz Incident

Posted by Amanda on September 21, 2012 at 10:05 AM Comments comments (1)

On 19th September...

North Sea

This is from diver onboard

Quick update for you all, Flakey was almost right but a few facts need clarifying:-

Both divers were outside the structure, looks like diver 1's umbilical got a turn around a external transponder bucket on side of structure when run off occurred. Vessel ran off 180 mts and did indeed part his umbilical. It took 26 mins to get the vessel back to over the structure, although the ROV had located him well before that, Chris the diver in question said he knew to try and conserve his gas even though he was freezing to death. He doesn't remember slipping into unconsciousness it just happened. It has been worked out that in total it took 46 mins to get him back in the bell, after 2 breaths by the bellman he started breathing on his own, he even stood up and out the way on his own steam to help in getting the bottom door down, once his breathing was restored he recovered quite quickly so they proceeded to start and warm him once the door was down and the bell was on its way up. (he was blue when they removed his hat). Diver 2 and the bellman were very professional in all of this as was the dive supervisor Craig Frederick, the lads themselves said Graig kept them focused and preempted everything.

Chris the diver climbed out of the bell and into the TL on his own steam and was warmed up further in the TL using the shower and wrapping him in towels, once stabilised he was transferred to the chamber. He appears to of made a full recovery and we have all been taking the piss at the lengths some people will go to for a short bellrun. ( obviously to try and lighten what was a very somber mood ) Chris has been very very very lucky. It brings it home just how quickly things can go pear shaped. The DP system is the prime suspect as the bridge said they had no control during the whole run off, that is being investigated with a fine toothcombe and we are all being decompressed as the investigation will be thorough and exhaustive time and getting back to work are not ab issue... I'll try and let you all know any outcomes when and if we find out !!


This and more: Longstreath.com

Bibby Topaz Incident

Posted by Amanda on September 21, 2012 at 10:05 AM Comments comments (1)

On 19th September...

North Sea

This is from diver onboard

Quick update for you all, Flakey was almost right but a few facts need clarifying:-

Both divers were outside the structure, looks like diver 1's umbilical got a turn around a external transponder bucket on side of structure when run off occurred. Vessel ran off 180 mts and did indeed part his umbilical. It took 26 mins to get the vessel back to over the structure, although the ROV had located him well before that, Chris the diver in question said he knew to try and conserve his gas even though he was freezing to death. He doesn't remember slipping into unconsciousness it just happened. It has been worked out that in total it took 46 mins to get him back in the bell, after 2 breaths by the bellman he started breathing on his own, he even stood up and out the way on his own steam to help in getting the bottom door down, once his breathing was restored he recovered quite quickly so they proceeded to start and warm him once the door was down and the bell was on its way up. (he was blue when they removed his hat). Diver 2 and the bellman were very professional in all of this as was the dive supervisor Craig Frederick, the lads themselves said Graig kept them focused and preempted everything.

Chris the diver climbed out of the bell and into the TL on his own steam and was warmed up further in the TL using the shower and wrapping him in towels, once stabilised he was transferred to the chamber. He appears to of made a full recovery and we have all been taking the piss at the lengths some people will go to for a short bellrun. ( obviously to try and lighten what was a very somber mood ) Chris has been very very very lucky. It brings it home just how quickly things can go pear shaped. The DP system is the prime suspect as the bridge said they had no control during the whole run off, that is being investigated with a fine toothcombe and we are all being decompressed as the investigation will be thorough and exhaustive time and getting back to work are not ab issue... I'll try and let you all know any outcomes when and if we find out !!


This and more: Longstreath.com

Accident at Houston school

Posted by Amanda on September 17, 2012 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

The following was on a Houston TV Station's website:

by Doug Miller / KHOU 11 News

khou.com

Posted on September 12, 2012 at 6:28 PM

 

 

HOUSTON—An accident at a southwest Houston trade school sent two commercial diving students to a hospital in critical condition.

 

The men were training in underwater construction techniques when they were both discovered unconscious, police said. It wasn’t immediately clear how long they were unconscious before others in the class noticed they were in trouble.

 

The accident happened around 11 a.m. Wednesday at The Ocean Corporation, a private school teaching commercial diving and underwater welding. Company officials wouldn’t reveal any specific information about the mishap.

 

"We train commercial divers and non-destructive testers," said Jeff Brown, the school’s director of student services. "It was part of their training, so the students were being trained at that time. And we’re just glad that we have such a good staff here that they were able to take appropriate action."

   

Amateur video shot shortly after the accident showed paramedics performing CPR on the two students.  

 

One of the victims appeared to be conscious and moving as he was wheeled away. A pair of Life Flight helicopters carried the two men to Memorial Hermann Hospital.

 

Police withheld the names of the two injured men pending notification of their families. One of them is 34 years old and the other is 28, police said.

 

The company has been training students since 1969, but Brown says this is the first time any of its students have suffered such a serious accident.

 

Another New Article http://www.chron.com...9652.php#src=fb

Inspection Inspection Inspection

Posted by Amanda on September 10, 2012 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (0)

It seems like there has been a vast amount of divers doing there inspection tickets. This is good for Thailand and UK Inspection schools and divers are digging deep to do the courses to potentially make themselves more marketable. But what do you think is it worth it?

Sad Sad Loss

Posted by Amanda on August 16, 2012 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (0)

It is sad to report that SubseaSA has recently been informed that a Nigerian diver has passed away during operations in Nigeria. Further details to follow please also keep a eye out on:

http://www.thediversassociation.com/index.php?/topic/274-nigerian-diver-death-godwin-udoh/

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.

 

Additional Items for Contractors and Operators to Consider

Posted by Amanda on July 10, 2012 at 5:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Additional Items for Contractors and Operators to Consider

Recent events in the Gulf of Mexico have forced all industry stakeholders to reevaluate how they approach operations, as a result of the Deepwater Horizon Spill. For Diving Contractors, this means devoting greater attention to:

· Evaluation of site plans for dealing with a contaminated diver

· Evaluation of whether 5 minute surface intervals can be met, if diving Sur 'D' O2

· Possibly limiting dives to "No Decompression"

· Reinforcement to personnel of their "Stop Work" authority

· The need for hydrocarbon monitors in saturation diving bells

· Need for a dedicated decontamination / wash down station on vessels for surfacing divers

Additionally, certain waterways that have been normally available to vessels and mariners are now restricted. This has increased vessel traffic, as fisherman and other boaters now look for new and accessible areas. This translates into an increased risk of vessel encroachments. As such, contractors are encouraged to stay vigilant in their monitoring of vessel traffic, when conducting underwater operations. There are several web sites which outline areas that vessels are encouraged to avoid, and track the spread of the oil spill.

Another new dynamic for industry personnel to take note of is the increased presence of personnel, enlisted to aid in the spill response and cleanup. Many of these individuals (new employees or volunteers) are not familiar with offshore safe practices and operations. This is probably most prevalent at the ports throughout the Gulf coast that have been dedicated to deploy personnel for spill cleanup.

In short, the items mentioned above are just a snapshot of the different challenges facing contractors and operators. There is much going on in the Gulf of Mexico, which will require a greater level of attention to detail by all.

This Information was sent to further the communication of all industry stakeholders. Safety is the primary concern of the ADCI. Remember: a real-time Job Safety Analysis is important, but nothing can replace good common sense.


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